jpgOperators say the Nigerian Liquefied Natural Gas (NLNG) Limited has the capacity to supply 150,000 metric tonnes per annum of LPG to the Nigerian market. For this modest aspiration, the country would require 225 trucks, 180 bottling plants, 5.8million cylinder requirements, and 96,000-bottles/day cylinder bottling capacity. Due to the impact of deforestation, an indigenous oil and gas company is gradually making forays to meet the nation’s requirements in the sector. GODWIN HARUNA writes…

As the world begins another series of talks on the climate change conundrum in Cancun, Mexico, people around the globe are looking for solutions that would mitigate its impact. Deforestation is one of the major challenges confronting Nigeria in the effort to maintain a sustainable environment. Domestic cooking gas has come as a veritable alternative to curb deforestation in order to have a sustainable environment in the country.

The statistics look scary, but it is not insurmountable. Operators of the Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG), popularly known as cooking gas, maintain that out of the 225 trucks so required, to distribute the product in the country, only 131 trucks are available. Of the 5,800,000 cylinders required only 80,000 are available. There are just 50 working plants in the country, out of the needed 180 plants, and of the 96,000 MT daily bottling capacity plants, only 18,000MT daily bottling capacity is accessible. These figures are reflective of the difficulties in making LPG available in every home in Nigeria in spite it’s obvious advantages over firewood for the cooking needs of the citizenry.

Source: thisdayonline.com/   Image: businessdailyafrica.com

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The UK government will launch two new public-private partnership funds to promote generation of renewable energy in Africa and Asia next year, the secretary of state for international development said recently.

green energyThe funds will target low-carbon energy and related investments in Asia, and large-scale renewable energy projects in Africa.

“We hope to launch these partnerships next year,” Andrew Mitchell said at a briefing in London.

A spokesman for the UK’s department for international development said it was looking at ways the funds could be financed, and could not put a value on them yet or identify the potential private sector partners.

Early modelling of the Asian fund suggests that it could bring 9 pounds of private sector investment for every pound committed by the government.

Over the next 25 years, the project could generate up to 5 gigawatts of renewable energy and avoid 150 million tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions.

The African fund could generate up to 500 megawatts of new renewable energy per year from 2015, providing enough electricity for over four million households.

The government will also launch a new advocacy fund to help the poorest nations be heard in international climate change and trade negotiations.

“This fund will provide access to legal, technical, and logistical support to the poorest and most vulnerable countries (…) whose full participation is essential if we are to achieve an equitable deal,” Mr. Mitchell said, referring to a global agreement on climate change.

Finance

In its spending review in October, Britain said it would provide 2.9 billion pounds of international climate finance to 2015. This will partly fund a 1.5 billion pound pledge of fast-start finance from 2010 to 2012.

At last year’s Copenhagen climate summit, rich countries pledged $30 billion of “fast start finance” to help poorer countries adapt to climate change and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions during 2010-2012.

Source: 234next.com Image: consumerenergyreport.com

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Linda Nordling

Cape Town — South Africa is spearheading activities to collect and curate research data about the African continent in an effort to shrug off its data-poor image.

fibre opticA prototype of the World Data Centre on Biodiversity and Human Health in Africa was presented at The Committee on Data for Science and Technology’s (CODATA) international conference in Cape Town recently.

The data centre, due to be launched early next year, will join the ranks of more than 50 world data centres – most of which are located in the United States, Europe and East Asia – which collect data in subjects like astronomy, geomagnetism and solar activity. The centres are currently being integrated into an overarching World Data Service.

Data on biodiversity and health in Africa is currently scattered around the world. The new centre aims to collect all this data into a single, online, resource that could be useful for African policymakers.

It will help researchers identify gaps in existing data and find historical data to compare to new findings, said Wim Hugo, a data expert from the South African Environmental Observation Network and one of the centre’s architects.

Users will also be able to layer different sets of data on top of one another, he said. For example, researchers could be able to call up a map of climate change projections (e.g. rainfall, temperature) and then the data on mosquito populations to get an idea of where mosquitoes are likely to be affected by climate change.

South Africa is also taking the lead in other data-gathering efforts. Last month, the US NASA space agency sent more than 30 terabytes (30,000 gigabytes) of free Earth science satellite data to South African researchers to support sustainable development and environmental applications.

Source:scidev.net/en/    Image: africanincubatornetwork

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Issa Sikiti Da Silva

cablesThe African continent will have 13 submarine cables by the end of 2011, a process that will redefine the technology environment and set the continent on a major broadband explosion, Sadiq Malik, director of operations at Broadband Communication Technologies (BCT), told a workshop at the Africa Media and Broadcasting 2010 Congress at the Sandton Convention Centre in Johannesburg, South Africa.

“Traffic on the world’s networks is being increased by 46% annually starting from 2007 until 2012. As a result, there will be an annual bandwidth demand of approximately 522 exabytes, or more than half a zettabyte,” Malik announced today, Monday, 29 November 2010.

“From currently being seen as a dark continent, Africa will become the light continent, simply because of the amount of bandwidth,” Malik, a visiting University of Cape Town Business School lecturer, said today.

Impact on economy

He said this bandwidth revolution will have a major impact on the continent’s economy because 1% increase in bandwidth has the power to increase a country’s GDP by 0.5%, as per the World Bank and International Telecommunications Union (ITU) forecasts.

The Africa Media and Broadcasting Congress is set to lasted for five days with a series of workshops and plenary sessions that discussed issues affecting the continent’s media and broadcasting industry.

Source: bizcommunity.com/      Image: worldbank

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Tunis — A leading Tunisian ICT engineering and consulting group, “Telnet”, has become the exclusive maker of a robotic systems for a US energy company based in Houston (Texas), the official Tunisian press agency, TAP reported recently without specifying the US company’s name.

After telecommunications, multimedia, industry, e-banking, smart cards, cars, security, defense, avionics and information systems, Telnet is embarking in a new strategic field, namely robotics, writes TAP.

The robotics branch, created under the new partnership with the US company, is part of Telnet’s innovation program based on the development of the group’s technological capacities.

The company’s CEO said that “the know-how of Tunisian competencies will enable the development of innovative solutions in energy-related robotics, through Tunisia-made robots that will be marketed throughout the world and offer new solutions to problems of hydrocarbon tanks monitoring, which could not be resolved by any other technology.”

Recently, the group closed an agreement (LINKLAB) with the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) in France.

LINKLAB is a common R&D platform, which aims at launching joint ventures in the fields of ICTs and new energy technologies.

Created in 1994, TELNET employs 500 employees including 400 engineers.

Source: tunisiaonlinenews.com/.   Image: Telnet

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