The UK government will launch two new public-private partnership funds to promote generation of renewable energy in Africa and Asia next year, the secretary of state for international development said recently.

green energyThe funds will target low-carbon energy and related investments in Asia, and large-scale renewable energy projects in Africa.

“We hope to launch these partnerships next year,” Andrew Mitchell said at a briefing in London.

A spokesman for the UK’s department for international development said it was looking at ways the funds could be financed, and could not put a value on them yet or identify the potential private sector partners.

Early modelling of the Asian fund suggests that it could bring 9 pounds of private sector investment for every pound committed by the government.

Over the next 25 years, the project could generate up to 5 gigawatts of renewable energy and avoid 150 million tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions.

The African fund could generate up to 500 megawatts of new renewable energy per year from 2015, providing enough electricity for over four million households.

The government will also launch a new advocacy fund to help the poorest nations be heard in international climate change and trade negotiations.

“This fund will provide access to legal, technical, and logistical support to the poorest and most vulnerable countries (…) whose full participation is essential if we are to achieve an equitable deal,” Mr. Mitchell said, referring to a global agreement on climate change.

Finance

In its spending review in October, Britain said it would provide 2.9 billion pounds of international climate finance to 2015. This will partly fund a 1.5 billion pound pledge of fast-start finance from 2010 to 2012.

At last year’s Copenhagen climate summit, rich countries pledged $30 billion of “fast start finance” to help poorer countries adapt to climate change and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions during 2010-2012.

Source: 234next.com Image: consumerenergyreport.com

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Issa Sikiti Da Silva

cablesThe African continent will have 13 submarine cables by the end of 2011, a process that will redefine the technology environment and set the continent on a major broadband explosion, Sadiq Malik, director of operations at Broadband Communication Technologies (BCT), told a workshop at the Africa Media and Broadcasting 2010 Congress at the Sandton Convention Centre in Johannesburg, South Africa.

“Traffic on the world’s networks is being increased by 46% annually starting from 2007 until 2012. As a result, there will be an annual bandwidth demand of approximately 522 exabytes, or more than half a zettabyte,” Malik announced today, Monday, 29 November 2010.

“From currently being seen as a dark continent, Africa will become the light continent, simply because of the amount of bandwidth,” Malik, a visiting University of Cape Town Business School lecturer, said today.

Impact on economy

He said this bandwidth revolution will have a major impact on the continent’s economy because 1% increase in bandwidth has the power to increase a country’s GDP by 0.5%, as per the World Bank and International Telecommunications Union (ITU) forecasts.

The Africa Media and Broadcasting Congress is set to lasted for five days with a series of workshops and plenary sessions that discussed issues affecting the continent’s media and broadcasting industry.

Source: bizcommunity.com/      Image: worldbank

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CAPE TOWN (Reuters) – The World Bank is planning to coordinate funding for 30 gigawatts (GW) of new power generation in Africa over the next five years, a senior official said on Monday.

power“We are not going to finance everything ourselves, but how we can help leverage financing for that 30 gigawatts of additional capacity,” Reynold Duncan, the bank’s Africa energy specialist, told reporters on the sidelines of power conference.

All potential projects, including the mammoth Inga hydropower scheme on the Congo river in Democratic Republic of Congo, would be considered, Duncan added, but gave no details of specific project funding.

In a major report last year, the World Bank said sub-Saharan Africa needed to double its infrastructure spending to $93 billion a year, 15 percent of regional output, to drag its road, water and power networks into the 21st century.

The region needs an extra 7,000 megawatts of capacity a year to meet the demand of its 800 million people, who currently have access to the same amount of power as Spain, with a population of just 45 million.

Source: Reuters   Image: Reuters

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