Malawi is seeking investors to inject $2bn in power projects aimed at improving generation and supply. The country aims to increase capacity from the current 282MW to 3 407MW by 2020.

invest in MalawiMalawi experiences major power outages due to existing shortcomings in power generation. Lack of adequate power supply – currently at 282.5MW against a demand of 344MW – has undermined the country’s ability to attract investment and speed up economic growth.

95% of the power is generated by hydroelectric power plants on the Shire river in the southern region and the remaining 5% by a mini plant on Wovwe river in the north. The planned investment in phase II of Kapichira hydropower plant and also the interconnection of the electricity grid with that of Mozambique in 2011 is expected to help boost supply.

The government is inviting private investors to invest in short and long-term projects worth $2-billion, which will see power supply reach 3 407 by 2020. Feasibility studies for the development of hydroelectric power stations on the Shire, Songwe, Bua, Dwambazi, South Rukuru and Ruo rivers have been undertaken.

Other natural resources that could be exploited range from uranium reserves, which could be used as fuel for nuclear power plants, and coal reserves that could be exploited for use in coal-fired power plants.

Source: TradeInvestAfrica         Image: malawivoice.com

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CAPE TOWN (Reuters) – The World Bank is planning to coordinate funding for 30 gigawatts (GW) of new power generation in Africa over the next five years, a senior official said on Monday.

power“We are not going to finance everything ourselves, but how we can help leverage financing for that 30 gigawatts of additional capacity,” Reynold Duncan, the bank’s Africa energy specialist, told reporters on the sidelines of power conference.

All potential projects, including the mammoth Inga hydropower scheme on the Congo river in Democratic Republic of Congo, would be considered, Duncan added, but gave no details of specific project funding.

In a major report last year, the World Bank said sub-Saharan Africa needed to double its infrastructure spending to $93 billion a year, 15 percent of regional output, to drag its road, water and power networks into the 21st century.

The region needs an extra 7,000 megawatts of capacity a year to meet the demand of its 800 million people, who currently have access to the same amount of power as Spain, with a population of just 45 million.

Source: Reuters   Image: Reuters

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